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Television Coverage for author Susan Denham Wade

A History of Seeing in Eleven Inventions author Susan Denham Wade is interviewed on American syndicated show The List

Author Susan Denham Wade has been interviewed on one of America’s most-popular syndicated TV programmes about how our addiction to visual devices is impacting our other senses. 

The author of new ‘smart thinking’ book A History of Seeing in Eleven Inventions, published by The History Press, appeared this week on Emmy Award-winning pop-culture show The List. 

She explained how sight has become the most dominant of our senses, and why this fixation on visual stimuli is making other senses such as touch and smell redundant – with potentially harmful effects for our well-being.   

Denham Wade, a client of book PR agency Palamedes, says that the smartphone may be to blame. While she says that it is arguably the most important inventions to have shaped humanity’s outlook, our heavy use of mobile devices means that we are not using our other senses enough. 

Susan Denham Wade
A History of Seeing in Eleven Inventions author Susan Denham Wade has been interviewed by Emmy award-winning American TV show The List about how our over-reliance on smartphones is impacting our five senses, and also our wellbeing.
A History Of Seeing front cover
A History of Seeing in Eleven Inventions by Susan Denham Wade is available now, published through The History Press.

The List is aired across ABC, NBC, CBS and FOX affiliates and the interview is also on its website: How Smartphones May Be Weakening Our Senses.

Denham Wade, who spent four years researching and writing A History of Seeing in Eleven Inventions, previously warned about our our senses are being impacted in an exclusive Daily Mail feature.

Her new book, which has been praised by Stephen Fry as a “a remarkable achievement”, provides a unique history of human sight broken down into 11 key visual inventions that have defined who we are.

These inventions include the including mastery of fire, mirrors, writing, spectacles, the telescope, and, most recently, the smartphone.

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